Chapter 20: “Limbering Up Ebenezer”

The Winter Marblelympics are here and it is time to chant GO GO SAVAGE SPEEDERS! Oh, and there’s a story too, something about a miserly couple that has a falling out over pickles and the foxtrot.  This week’s genre: Romance then Not Romance.

“Limbering Up Ebenezer” is from the May 1919 edition of Saucy Stories Magazine and it is basically congealed jargon aggressively molded into two columns and three pages. So curl up in your favorite town hall bench and grab a drink of free tap water while we read you this week’s tale.

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Chapter 19 – “The Winds, the Birds, and the Telegraph Wires”

What is the acceptable age for owning a waterbed? Then, a succinct little fable about some kind of god named the “Earth King” – who may or may not have a Swedish nu-metal band backing him – and his travails hiring contractors.  This week’s genre: Fairy Tales.

“The Winds, the Birds, and the Telegraph Wires” is by Revered Jay T. Stocking, and it appears in an anthology entitled “Twenty Four Unusual Stories for Boys and Girls,” arranged and retold by Anna Cogswell Tyler.  It nicely explains why the winds hate the birds and the birds hate wires, but it does not explain how “Birds on a Wire” failed at the box office, so there’s still a lot of mystery left in the world.  So curl up in your favorite rainbow bed, and grab a rainbow popsicle and celebrate like it’s the Fourth of July, as we read you this week’s tale.

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Chapter 18: “The Devil’s Jest”

Weird fruits, part two – the paw paw.  After that, Alan reads a yarn of a dying man’s confession to a conveniently placed burglar.  This week’s genre: Suspense.

“The Devil’s Jest” by Robert Terry Shannon comes from the pages of Argosy All-Story Weekly, Dec 15th, 1923, and it concerns the revenge of a man who gets his medical advice from Dr Oz and definitely needs a subscription to the Times.  So curl up in your favorite hospice bed with a glistening revolver as we read you this week’s tale.

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Chapter 17: “Twixt Life and Death”

Weird fruits, part one: the Durian. Then a manx tale from the Isle of Man involving wholesale theft of seagull eggs!  Seriously, people are about to be put in jail over this. This week’s genre: Adventure/Mystery/Poetry.

“Twixt Life and Death” by Clucas Jouchin is from the 1905 anthology Fifty-Two Stories for Girls edited by Alfred H. Miles, and there is no doubt that this story is extremely appropriate for girls of all ages who dream of being a sleepwalker and really — really — don’t care for dogs.  So curl up on your favorite coat and grab a drink while we read you this week’s tale.

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